Luton gathers to remember its fallen heroes

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Veterans, families, the uniformed services and dignitaries turned out in Luton on Sunday to mark 100 years after the guns fell silent, marking the end of World War One.

Luton Council extended its traditional Remembrance Day commemorations into the evening of Sunday, November 11.

Poppies, Poetry and Projections included a programme of striking projections onto the Town Hall, a display of light-up poppies by local children, poetry and spoken word by local artists, and music by the Salvation Army Band.

The traditional Remembrance Day service started at 10.40am, with the parade from Park Street West up to the war memorial in George Street followed by the Exhortation, and the recitals, prayers and readings from representatives of Luton’s communities and the armed forces. Poppies were then laid at the war memorial.

Local residents, veterans and relatives of those who fought in the Great War joined children at the evening service with poppies they made at workshops held during October half-term.

Local spoken word artists performed poems that explore the wartime tradition of writing poetry and letters to loved ones in the context of Luton today. The projections onto the Town Hall recognised those who gave their lives during the Great War.

The evening ended with the lighting of a beacon, the ringing out of the bells and the cry for peace performed by local poet, Lee Nelson.

Deputy Lieutenant of Bedfordshire, Colette McKeaveney said: “It was very poignant and beautiful, especially moving to see the names and addresses of all the Lutonians who lost their lives projected onto the wall.”